5 Ways to Maintain Appetite

A good appetite is a sign of a healthy animal, but can sometimes be hard to maintain, especially in the summer months. Here are 5 quick tips for promoting a steady appetite in your livestock. Clean Water: Water is one of the most important nutrients for your livestock and often one of the most overlooked. […]

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Opportunity Knocks During the Grazing Season

By Dennis Delaney, Inside Sales Manager Spring and early summer generally offer conditions long on grass and short on stress. Cows are in peak milk production, calves are at the most efficient period of their lives, and forages are at their best. Successful producers seize this opportunity to capture maximum pounds of beef per acre, […]

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Do I Need to Feed Salt to My Cattle?

Our VitaFerm mineral labels often say in the feeding instructions to offer additional salt. Beef cattle do have a requirement for salt and in most of the formulations we strive to meet the basic need. However, not all of the products contain salt and with those products producers should always feed additional salt. Examples include our […]

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Grass Tetany Awareness and Prevention

Following a rough, cold winter, it seems that spring is finally arriving. Temperatures are on the rise, many parts of the country are finally beginning to receive rain, and pastures are beginning to green. For most of us this is a welcomed event that leads to less time in the calving barn, reduced time feeding […]

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Improve the Way You Creep Feed

Now is the time to begin thinking about your creep feed rations. Creep feed allows producers to efficiently put weight on young calves, as small calves are very efficient at converting feed to gain. Also, as calves pass the 90-120 day mark they begin to need additional supplementation as the lactating beef cow is only […]

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Managing Heat Stress

by Kevin Glaubius, VitaFerm® Director of Nutrition and Technical Sales Support Heat stress impacts the performance of cattle with millions of dollars of annual economic losses. Animal responses to heat stress include reduced dry matter intake, decreased average daily gain, decreased milk yield, decreased fertility and poor reproduction. As Figure 1 reflects, the degree of […]

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